Last edited by Akim
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of Background knowledge and reading comprehension found in the catalog.

Background knowledge and reading comprehension

Adams, Marilyn.

Background knowledge and reading comprehension

by Adams, Marilyn.

  • 81 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by ERIC in [Washington,D.C.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ED 181 431.

Statementby Marilyn Adams and Bertram Bruce.
SeriesERIC reports
ContributionsBruce, Bertram., Educational Resources Information Center.
The Physical Object
Pagination1 microfiche
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20152980M

Background knowledge plays a strong role in reading comprehension as well as content learning; when individuals have knowledge about a particular topic, they are better able to recall and elaborate on the topic. Our experiences as teachers, as well as research on the brain and learning, have shown us that when students know about a topic. The Role of Background Knowledge One of the most critical components of helping English language learners (ELLs) succeed academically is the role of background knowledge. Lessons, reading passages, and test questions that assume prior knowledge or familiarity with a certain experience, person, or object may not be an appropriate tool for ELLs.

Building Background Knowledge for Reading Narrative Fiction To entice students prior to reading a fictional passage, it is common to ask, “ What do you know about [the topic].” However, that could encourage students to focus too much on general information that may not support understanding the particular text they will read. In the present study, the role of cultural background knowledge on the reading comprehension of third graders acquiring literacy in Dutch as a first and second language is examined while the children read noncontrived texts from the reading curricula.

comprehension, they are caused by a deficiency of requisite knowledge. The solution, then, is merely to build in that knowledge. Clearly, availability of appropriate background knowledge is necessary for comprehension, and many reading problems may be traceable to mismatches between background knowledge.   We investigated this phenomenon with a sample of 3, high school students who took a background-knowledge test before working on a reading-comprehension test on the topic of ecology. Broken-line regression revealed a knowledge threshold: Below the threshold, the relationship between comprehension and knowledge was weak (β = ), but above.


Share this book
You might also like
Vegetarian barbecues

Vegetarian barbecues

The Thoemmes encyclopedia of the history of ideas

The Thoemmes encyclopedia of the history of ideas

nature of human movement

nature of human movement

Water resources policy issues

Water resources policy issues

System tests and applications photovoltaic program

System tests and applications photovoltaic program

Themes for college writers

Themes for college writers

Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia

Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia

Betrayed skies

Betrayed skies

This rough magic.

This rough magic.

The tragicall history of D. Faustus

The tragicall history of D. Faustus

Technical cooperation in health.

Technical cooperation in health.

The methods book

The methods book

Cross Nail

Cross Nail

Background knowledge and reading comprehension by Adams, Marilyn. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The article subtitle was “Schools usually focus on teaching comprehension skills instead of general knowledge – even though education researchers know better.”. The piece suggests that educators have treated comprehension as a set of skills, when in fact comprehension depends primarily on what readers already know.

Youki Terada, Research and Standards Editor for Edutopia, has found that research has revealed an important factor to reading comprehension: background knowledge.

Background knowledge acts as scaffolding, so when a student builds on existing information they already know, they’re better able to understand and remember the material.

One of its “essential insights” is the role of content knowledge in reading success: “Students’ background knowledge is essential to reading comprehension.

Curricula should help students build content knowledge in history and science, in order to empower reading success.” This topic deserves a lot more attention. See all Background Knowledge articles > Classroom Strategies Each strategy includes instructions on how to use, downloadable templates and examples, video demonstrations, children's books to use with the strategy, differentiation for ELLs and students with learning disabilities, and supporting research.

Background Knowledge and Reading Comprehension. Reading Education Report No. AND READING COMPREHENSION. Background Knowledge. So very much of what we learn. There is a virtual consensus that background knowledge is essential for reading comprehension.

Put simply, the more you know about a topic, the easier it is to read. Discipline Domain-Specific (DDS) Background Knowledge and Language Proficiency The question of what role DDS background knowledge plays in academic reading has interested many researchers in reading comprehension and practitioners in the field of language.

Cognitive psychologist Daniel Willingham notes that a student’s background knowledge is among the strongest factors predicting his or her reading comprehension. As he wrote recently in his blog, “Once kids are fluent decoders, much of the difference among readers is not due to whether [they’re] a ‘good reader’ or ‘bad reader’ (meaning [they] have good or bad reading skills).

Background of the Study. Reading comprehension skill is a fundamental skill to obtain further academic learning success. To get further knowledge, college students are required to.

have. critical and analytical competence in comprehending academic s, in text searching more academic information through various types of reading materials.

The results revealed that a background-knowledge score of aboutor about 59% correct, functioned as a performance threshold.

Below this score, background knowledge and comprehension were not noticeably correlated; above the threshold score, students’ comprehension appeared to increase as their background knowledge increased.

Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement. by Robert J. Marzano. Table of Contents. Chapter 1. The Importance of Background Knowledge.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics (), every day from September to June some million students in the United States walk into classes that teach English, mathematics, science, history, and geography and face the. Using prior knowledge is an essential strategy for reading comprehension.

The more knowledge students have on a topic, the easier it will be for them to understand, and make connections to, new texts. Prior knowledge is also part of the building blocks for more difficult reading strategies, such as making inferences. Below are 8 ways you can teach and practice the using background knowledge.

“Activating Background Knowledge” is one of several key comprehension strategies. Colleen Buddy proposed three different ways in which readers draw upon their background knowledge to make connections to the text:  text-to-self, text-to-text and text-to-world (Buddy quoted in Keene and Zimmerman, ).

Separate components of background knowledge which have been identified in the literature are: (1) prior knowledge in the content area of the text (familiar vs. novel); (2) prior knowledge that the text is about a particular content area (context vs. no context); and (3) degree to which the lexical items in the text reveal the content area Cited by:   Background Knowledge is like a compass, guiding readers to comprehension.

This is why reading comprehension is not a linear process; we comprehend different texts at various degrees of competence based upon our unique prior knowledge we bring to the text. Using prior knowledge is an important part of reading comprehension for children with dyslexia.

Students relate the written word to their previous experiences to make reading more personal, helping them to both understand and remember what they have : Eileen Bailey. Background Knowledge and Reading Comprehension by Joan Sedita, Houston Branch of the IDA, Resource Directory (5 pages).

After a review and discussion of the role of background knowledge to support comprehension, this article presents suggestions for teaching a question-generation strategy. Students are full of experience and background knowledge about all sorts of things.

For many children, however, the background knowledge they bring to any reading task may not match well with that task, so better to think of lack of background knowledge as task specific rather than some inherent deficit in the : Russ Walsh.

There is wide agreement among reading researchers that every time a reader reads anything, they make use of the following strategies: Activate prior knowledge, and connect the applicable prior experiences to the reading (if students don't have the requisite background knowledge about a topic, they will be unable to comprehend) Set Purposes; Predict.

This book studies the effect of background knowledge on reading comprehension and investigates the claim from the field of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) that tertiary level students for whom English is a second language should be given reading proficiency tests in their own academic subject areas.

The volume includes a comprehensive overview of recent research into reading, in both a. Background knowledge plays an important role in reading comprehension.

A reader with insufficient background knowledge will find it difficult to draw inferences between information read in a text and information in the long-term memory. Readers with good background knowledge will have no difficulty as they use comprehension strategies.To address background knowledge, teachers must: Identify the critical pre-skills or background knowledge that is most relevant to the new task and will ease acquisition of the new knowledge, task, or skill.

Determine if the background information needs to be primed (brief reminder) or taught through a more deliberate instructional sequence.Reading Philosophy and Background Knowledge There are multiple goals achieved by reading.

There are also multiple methods of reading. Nevertheless, background knowledge and meta-cognition are central to expert reading in all settings.3 In this section, background knowledge is discussed.

Readers understand a text when they construct a meaning by.